On July 1, 2019, Californians will no longer have the freedom to buy ammo without infringement.

On November 8, 2016, Californias voted “yes” to Proposition 63, requiring background checks and face-to-face purchases of ammunition. Supporters of the law say that being able to purchase ammo freely is a legal “loophole.” Hannah Shearer, Giffords Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence litigation director says, “Unsurprisingly, mass shooters have assembled arsenals by ordering ammunition online, and each year California law enforcement officers have uncovered hundreds of thousands of rounds of illegal ammunition while investigating the illegal possession of firearms.”

With proper storage, ammo last decades. If you live in California, you need to stock up on ammo before July 1, 2019.
We have 12 good reasons why you should start stockpiling ammo now.

Federal law states that ammo cannot be sold to, purchased or possessed by:

  • Convicted felons
  • Drug abusers
  • Those under a domestic violence restraining order
  • People under indictment for a crime punishable by more than one year in prison
  • Fugitives from the law
  • Been adjudicated as mentally defective or involuntarily committed to a mental institution
  • Illegal aliens
  • Soldiers dishonorably discharged from the military
  • Anyone who has renounced their U.S. citizenship

It is also federally illegal to transfer or possess long gun ammo to anyone under 18 and handgun ammo to anyone under 21. “Armor-piercing” handgun bullets are also restricted by federal law. These are also the same restrictions that federally regulate gun ownership.

Beginning July 1, 2019, gun owners in California will have to submit to a background check at a licensed dealer to buy ammo. The background check will cost $1 per transaction. The dealer is then required to keep a record of the buyer’s name, birthday and address, as well as report the purchase to the California Department of Justice which will maintain a database of ammo sales.

California gun stores have seen a sharp increase in ammo purchases, with some buyers purchasing 1,000 rounds at a time.

One good reason why stock up—belt fed machine guns!
Belt fed machine guns eat a lot of ammo. Photo by Sgt. Daniel Cole, U.S. Army Europe Public Affairs

Six-time Olympic medalist, Kim Rhode, along with the California Rifle and Pistol Association filed a lawsuit against California in April 2018. Rhode says, “These regulations essentially prevent me from being able to stay qualified and not only hurt my skill but jeopardize the United States’ representation at the Olympic Games.” Kim lives in California and goes through thousands of rounds of ammo a week. A hearing for the lawsuit is set for November 15, 2019.

Let California be an example of why we need to stockpile ammo.

Here are five other reasons why you should stockpile ammo:

  1. Laws can change. If they want, our local and federal governments will find a way to enact laws without going through the legal process of getting something banned…. ahem…bump stocks.
  2. Ammo shortages. From 2008 to 2013, the country experienced a massive ammo shortage—mainly .22 LR, .380 ACP and other popular handgun cartridges. The election of the Greatest Gun Salesman in History lead to a panic-buy frenzy that drove ammo prices high and inventory very low. This shortage lasted years.
  3. Natural disasters/emergencies/survival/zombie apocalypse/SHTF/TEOTWAWKI. Whatever your favorite end-of-the-world flavor is, is a justifiable and legitimate reason to store thousands of rounds of ammo. Not just to fight and defend, but also to use as a bartering tool.
  4. Continued shooting practice. Staying well-versed at your firearm’s basic functions and being a good marksman includes regular training and practice. You should have enough ammo to continue to practice when times get tough, we see another shortage or laws in your state become restrictive. Some recommend 1,000 training rounds, 1,000 self-defense rounds and 1,000 rounds just in storage for each caliber of firearm you own.
  5. Buying in bulk is cheaper—especially if you catch a good sale. Subscribe to the sales emails of every reputable online ammo dealer and purchase ammo when it is discounted.
  6. Rare and hard-to-find calibers. These calibers and the old military stuff will be harder and harder to find. If you have a rare or hard-to-find caliber firearm, don’t let it become obsolete. Stock up on the ammo now while you still can.

And six other reasons as stated by GunLove Blog staff:

Ammo needs to be stored in sealed ammo cans away from extreme head and moisture.
Keep ammo in ammo cans, away from extreme heat and moisture.
  1. Liberals getting into office.
  2. Machine guns.
  3. Belt-fed machine guns.
  4. Bump stocks recovered from tragic boating accidents.
  5. Civil war.
  6. Texas seceding.

Keep Your Power Dry—How to Store Ammo

Ammunition, especially modern ammo, will last decades if stored properly. The main sources of degradation for ammo are humidity (moisture) and extreme heat. Heat will degrade primer and powder while humidity can corrode the casing and bullet.

Store ammo off the ground in sealable containers in a cool, dry place away from direct sunlight. Plastic ammo cans, spam cans and specialized bags are good choices.

There are no federal restrictions on how many rounds of ammo you can own. However, be aware that the Department of Homeland Security and the FBI believe that stockpiling “large amounts” of ammunition indicates someone who may be planning an attack. Offthegridnews.com reports that a joint agency released bulletin states, “The following activities could indicate attempts to stockpile large quantities of weapons or explosive materials for use in an attack. Depending on the context time, location, personal behaviors, and other indicators persons who attempt to acquire explosive materials or precursors should be reported to appropriate authorities.”

As far as how much ammo should you stockpile? Well, there is no real set rule. The common answer is 1,000 rounds for training and practice and another 1,000 solely for storing for each caliber. However, GunLove says as much as you can afford and store.

What is your stockpiling story? Leave it in the comment section. Did we leave any good ammo storage suggestions out? We know you want to tell us. Also, leave your tips and tell us what we left out in the comments.